Used wrong caulk in bathroom...?

Discussion in 'Painting Forum' started by zepper, Feb 11, 2018.

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  1. Feb 11, 2018 #1

    zepper

    zepper

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    Hope this is the right section for this... If not, feel free to move it.

    I made a real amateur mistake, caulk-wise. I'm replacing all the baseboards and door trim in our house. I started with a silicone-based caulk. Then a friend pointed out this stuff:

    [​IMG]

    "Why mess with silicone when you don't have to?" he suggested.

    Well, you guessed it: I used it in the bathroom. A couple of days later I was painting part of it and noticed that it crumbled easily when wet. So this'll be a problem in a moist location, right? I should've used special kitchen/bath caulk, right? Hindsight, what a thing.

    My question is, do I need to rip everything out, scrape off all the caulk and start over? Or can I add a clear coat of something to seal what's there?

    Thanks—and feel free to chuckle and/or roll your eyes before making suggestions.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2018
  2. Feb 11, 2018 #2

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

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    Are you using it on baseboards still or caulking around a tub or shower where there's a wet environment?
     
  3. Feb 11, 2018 #3

    Gary

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    If it were mine, I would remove it and re-caulk, but that's just me. You may spend as much or more time trying to save it than just starting over with a product that will hold up. The only expense is just a little "elbow grease" and a few tubes of silicone.
     
  4. Feb 11, 2018 #4

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    Silicone works best 20' deep in a landfill, unopened.

    Polyseamseal works with your dampened finger and is paintable, and elastomeric for 20yrs.
     
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  5. Feb 11, 2018 #5

    chrisn

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    LOL, you must be or have been a painter
     
  6. Feb 12, 2018 #6

    Snoonyb

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    I was the "talented laborer" for MR KITCHENS on Redondo in L.B. in 1973.
     
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  7. Feb 12, 2018 #7

    zepper

    zepper

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    No, I'm not quite that dense... Just on the baseboards, away from actual splashes.

    "Little elbow grease":

    1. Cut caulk.
    2. Pry off boards.
    3. Scrape caulk off of boards and walls.
    4. Pull nails out of boards and/or walls.
    5. Repair and/or repaint any wall scrapes.
    6. Nail boards back in.
    7. Set nails where nail gun didn't fire right.
    8. Fill, sand, paint nail holes (both past and present).
    9. Re-caulk.
    (During 1–9:) Endure wife's tittering over redundant labor

    I'm just wondering if all that's necessary. I mean, if the right stuff does that good a job keeping moisture away from the boards, won't it keep it away from whatever it's applied over? Thus my topic, see, wondering about that thang.

    It does a decent job in women's chests, too, but that may be beyond the scope of this thread.

    Great, glad to know about it... And any idea how it may do over painter's caulk? (Sorry if I seem redundant here. Sorry if I seem redundant here.)
     
  8. Feb 12, 2018 #8

    zepper

    zepper

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    Well, fellows, I took another look in there, and I got a nice flush bead all around, so I'm just going to pick up some of Snoonyb's Polyseamseal and run some of that around the room too.

    Snoon, I take it you were referring to this flavor:

    LOCTITE® POLYSEAMSEAL® TUB & TILE ADHESIVE CAULK – SCRUB & MILDEW RESISTANT SEALANT

    The product description:

    ...has inspired my confidence. If the experiment works, I'll post a happy conclusion here in, oh, let's say, a few years. If it's a disaster, you'll hear from me sooner.

    Thanks for all your input! Yours in wifely titter avoidance, Z.
     
  9. Feb 12, 2018 #9

    Snoonyb

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    Each will have their own level of quality that they can comfortably stand behind.

    Another moment of historical trivia; I was associated with a few of those "pairs", from the Lakewood Club, which was one of Sonny & Cher's stops in the late 60's, on their way to fame.

    It works, but the tooling will add to the build up.
     
  10. Feb 12, 2018 #10

    Snoonyb

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    Locktite is the CO. Polyseamseal, in the 60's, 70's & 80's, was a stand-alone product and a color matching squeeze tube was included with every KOHLER sink, back in the days when self-rimming sinks were in vogue.

     
  11. Feb 13, 2018 #11

    zepper

    zepper

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    Hey, thanks! The next time my wife says, "Why is this taking you so long??", I'll adopt a proud posture and say that. (Then, once she finishes laughing...)

    Sorry, you've lost me, but it sounds like a great story, so I hope you'll elaborate.

    They used to include tubes of BBQ sauce in the middle of cans (that's right, cans) of hot dogs, but I don't expect anyone here to remember back that far.
     
  12. Feb 13, 2018 #12

    zepper

    zepper

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    Okay, this confirms it—I just downloaded the manufacturer's more detailed product brochure, which says:

    (It doesn't actually say "dumb-***"; the forum did that. Real handypeople don't shy away from the occasional mild oath, which is considered character-building—unless you're, say, Amish.)
     
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  13. Feb 14, 2018 #13

    Snoonyb

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    The Los Angeles Basin, in the 60's thru 80's, was rife with topless establishments and some of them had stages conducive to a variety of entertainment.

    Before their eventual popularity, Sonny and Cher, needed a source of income, and
    there was an abundance, as an average, the usual "dancers" would take home $250 to $400 for an 8hr. shift, and they played a variety of venues, along with a number of fledgling bands of the era.
     

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