What are my options?

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by debraanne, Dec 28, 2010.

  1. Dec 28, 2010 #1

    debraanne

    debraanne

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    I am planning to enclose a portion of my concrete-block garage as a studio, and I need to be able to keep the temperature inside the room around 45-50 degrees during the winter (central Illinois). Assuming I insulate it really well, does anyone have any idea of the best way to heat this space (the room is 10 x 17, so 170 sf)? It has to be electric. I am trying to make plans now and need to know what my options are so I can get started. Would baseboard heaters work? A wall unit? I've tried to research it, but just get more confused with all the info...lol
    Thanks!
     
  2. Dec 28, 2010 #2

    paul52446m

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    They make electric unit heaters that hang from ceiling or wall mount. They have a fan to blow the heat down, and they will heat a lot faster then baseboard electric. Paul
     
  3. Dec 29, 2010 #3

    debraanne

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    I need something that I can keep on all the time to maintain a constant temperature; would the ceiling/wall-mount units work best for that?
     
  4. Dec 29, 2010 #4

    paul52446m

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    If you are going to be turning the heat up and down a lot then the unit will
    heat up faster. But ether the baseboard or unit heater will do the job.
    if you want your floor a little warmer then you might want a small ceiling fan to hold the heat down, and keep the floor warmer.
    A lot less to go wrong with baseboard. Paul
     
  5. Dec 29, 2010 #5

    debraanne

    debraanne

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    Thanks for the help Paul. I'm mostly concerned with keeping the room above freezing during the cold winter months. Mostly 45-50 degrees, with maybe once or twice a week turning the heat up to 65 when I was spending time in it. I know absolutely nothing about baseboard heaters. Are they safe? What are some safety concerns/clearance issues, etc?
     
  6. Dec 29, 2010 #6

    paul52446m

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    As far as i know they are safe, they use them in a lot of homes.
    I am into gas heating and boilers, so i don't sell or install electric
    heat very much. paul
     
  7. Dec 29, 2010 #7

    nealtw

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    baseboards are cheep and relieble. run them on 12/3 wire on 240 20amp breaker and you can run about sixteen feet of baseboard run the wire to a large box for a double pole thermistat and stick the wire out of the drywall where you want the baseboard, goodluck
     
  8. Dec 29, 2010 #8

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    I would go with Forced air electric, they heat the room faster, take less wall space. I have them in a few rooms of my house and I thnk there great.
     
  9. Dec 29, 2010 #9

    debraanne

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    Daryl, any particular brand/make/model you would recommend?
    I looked at a few on-line, and they said to mount them 8-9 feet high???
    My ceilings in that room are only 7 feet, but I think I would prefer a wall unit as opposed to baseboard heating. How much clearance would I need around it?
    Thanks for all your help!
     
  10. Dec 30, 2010 #10

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    Are you sure that wasn't 8-9 Inches, the ones I have and see everywhere are Dimplex and are intalled at a 8" min off the floor. I will see if I can find the specs and I will get back to you but you don't need a lot of clearence. :) I just checked and its 8 inch clearence top bottom and sides
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2010
  11. Dec 30, 2010 #11

    havasu

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    Have you considered electric radiant floor heating? It is an easy install under floor tile, and had a thermostat to keep it a constant temperature.
     
  12. Dec 31, 2010 #12

    GBR

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    Check with your local B.D. as other to other requirements. An air supply, smoke detector, weather-stripped door from the garage space, vapor barrier plastic on the slab, proper egress - all may be needed to meet minimum safety Code.

    Gary
     
  13. Dec 31, 2010 #13

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    Well this is my take on these 3 idea's
    Baseboard is the least expensive but you lose wall space where it or they are installed, they take a while to heat the rooAm up and are expensive to run
    In floor heating is the most expensive to buy out of the 3 and the proper thermostat is very expensive, it is real nice on the toes though :)
    Forced air units are small, inexpensive but more than baseboard, heats the room up fast and the lose of space in minimal. A 2000 watt will more than do the job for 170 sqft:D
     
  14. Dec 31, 2010 #14

    debraanne

    debraanne

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    Thank you all for your input. I think I will probably go with a wall unit, the main goal is just to keep the contents of the room from freezing when it gets really cold. I have to have some electrical work done out there, so I will see if the electrician has any recommendations also.
    I'll have a lot more questions later when I really get involved in this project, probably around the beginning of February (right now I'm mainly planning and budgeting).
    Thanks again!
    Debra
     
  15. Jan 2, 2011 #15

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    Well good luck on everything and someones always here to help out Happy New year Debraanne :banana:

    logo_large.gif
     
  16. Jan 3, 2011 #16

    debraanne

    debraanne

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    Thanks Daryl, happy New Year to you , also!
     
  17. Mar 28, 2011 #17

    debraanne

    debraanne

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    Okay, after months of research, I think we're going with the Q-Mark LFK 304 wall heater, 3000 watt. Does anyone have any feedback regarding this brand?
     
  18. Mar 28, 2011 #18

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    Should do you just fine. One thing though I would have a proper wall thermostate put in, I hate the built in ones,
     
  19. Mar 29, 2011 #19

    debraanne

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    Thanks, Daryl. I'll check with my electrician about installing a wall thermostat.
    I appreciate your feedback!
     
  20. Apr 7, 2011 #20

    debraanne

    debraanne

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    Would there be any advantage to going with the 4000 watt unit? Our electrician mentioned something about a larger unit working "less hard" to heat the space therefore possibly less electricity used? I know 3000 will keep the room warm enough, I'm concerned with energy ($$$$) usage????
     

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