Adding a shower

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by NewHomeBuyer87, Aug 9, 2017.

Help Support House Repair Talk by donating using the link above.
  1. Aug 9, 2017 #1

    NewHomeBuyer87

    NewHomeBuyer87

    NewHomeBuyer87

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2017
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm looking at a house and the upstairs only has a half bath. As I wouldn't want to go downstairs to shower daily, I was wondering if it's possible to add a stand alone shower. The space isn't that large, but trying to think outside the box. From the wall by the counter to where the door would land when open is about 57inches. The width is about 55inches.

    Do you think a shower addition is possible without having everything edge to edge? I'd also want a nice size shower so I don't feel boxed in. I included a rough diagram of the room

    Estimated price to remodel if they only gave to move an outlet and don't have to add plumbing?

    Screenshot_20170804-211103.jpg

    Screenshot_20170808-232342.jpg

    Screenshot_20170808-232446.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2017
  2. Aug 9, 2017 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,028
    Likes Received:
    3,164
    No problem.:hide:

    -camper-bathroom-rv-bathrooms.jpg
     
  3. Aug 9, 2017 #3

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,028
    Likes Received:
    3,164
    Can you do a sketch of the room with measurement for the whole room and where the toilet is.
     
  4. Aug 9, 2017 #4

    NewHomeBuyer87

    NewHomeBuyer87

    NewHomeBuyer87

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2017
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I added some additional diagrams
     
  5. Aug 9, 2017 #5

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,028
    Likes Received:
    3,164
    That is tight.......
     
  6. Aug 9, 2017 #6

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,077
    Likes Received:
    547
    A stall shower will fit, however you may need to do some additional demo because the shower requires a 2" drain and the pullman is likely 1-1/2".
     
  7. Aug 12, 2017 #7

    slownsteady

    slownsteady

    slownsteady

    Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2009
    Messages:
    6,607
    Likes Received:
    1,197
    If the shower is important enough, you could sacrifice that large sink cabinet and gain some valuable space. Put the shower in the left-hand corner and have the sink moved to the wall on the right.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  8. Aug 14, 2017 #8

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    922
    Likes Received:
    332
    You could look at either reversing the door to an outswing or replacing it with a pocket door to open up more space. Making the whole bathroom a wet space to eliminate the need for a shower curb and enclosure could work as well. You'd essentially have a tile shower pan for the entire floor in the room, with a slight curb at the door to send all the water towards the drain.
     
    slownsteady likes this.
  9. Aug 14, 2017 #9

    frodo

    frodo

    frodo

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Messages:
    3,066
    Likes Received:
    1,196
    to do that , the toilet would have to raise up and sit on a water proof curb

    2'' minimum

    ,,,,,.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2017
  10. Aug 14, 2017 #10

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,028
    Likes Received:
    3,164
    Something like this.

    =1.jpg

    =2.jpg
     
    Sparky617 likes this.
  11. Aug 14, 2017 #11

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    922
    Likes Received:
    332
    If required, a cleaner solution would be to do a wall mounted toilet with the waste connection going into the wall instead of the floor. Fewer choices but certainly better than the curb idea in the diagram you provided.

    https://www.lowes.com/pd/American-S...gated-Custom-Height-2-piece-Toilet/1000002258
     
  12. Aug 14, 2017 #12

    frodo

    frodo

    frodo

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Messages:
    3,066
    Likes Received:
    1,196
    much cleaner idea, as long as you have an 8'' wall for the carrier and plumbing
    your good to go
     
  13. Aug 14, 2017 #13

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    922
    Likes Received:
    332
    I've seen wet baths like Neal posted, without the toilet sitting on a curb. Before I built a curb I'd check with the local code office for requirements. The seal between the toilet and the flange is sealed with the wax ring, so I'm not sure what the requirement for the curb would satisfy other than making the toilet 4" higher.
     
  14. Aug 14, 2017 #14

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,077
    Likes Received:
    547
    Post #9 says 2".

    However those that neal posted have a definite demarkation separating the flat walking floor surface, which you advocated and FRODO was responding too, too the sloped shower floor, which have defined pattern shower heads when they are W/O encl's.
     
  15. Aug 14, 2017 #15

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    922
    Likes Received:
    332
    We're just offering suggestions here, not one of the designing the bathroom space. There are ways to do it without the toilet sitting on a 2" curb. Sorry I wrote 4" on my earlier post, we have since moved on to page two and I was going from memory after reading some of the additional give and take.

    People are going for curb-less showers to allow for accessibility these days, this kind of design is becoming more common.
     
    nealtw likes this.
  16. Aug 14, 2017 #16

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,077
    Likes Received:
    547
    If people follow your supposition that the wax ring is all that is necessary to seal the toilet and prevent water leaking through the floor, what the curb would prevent, they have no Idea what the wax ring actually does, or how often they leak.

    Sloping the section of the floor which is distinctly the shower area and installing patterned shower heads, prevents the room floor becoming a bathtub.
     
  17. Aug 14, 2017 #17

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,028
    Likes Received:
    3,164
    I think, once in a while. And about this I think you want the toilet on a level platform while the rest of the floor can slope to the drain.
     
  18. Aug 14, 2017 #18

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    922
    Likes Received:
    332
    Snoony B
    The entire floor would be included in the shower pan. Yes, make the toilet area flat, some water may splash out into the area, As depicted in Neal's picture the shower curtain would keep nearly all of it in the sloped floor area.

    We're here to offer suggestions on how he could fit a shower bath in a tight spot. The actual mechanics of how it is going to happen will not be hashed out in an internet bulletin board. Reversing the door, and doing away with a shower curb, are ways he can get more into the bathroom than is currently there.

    The wax ring provides a seal for sewer gases coming up into the room. It also provides a water seal, that will prevent water coming out from under the toilet even when the plumbing is clogged below the toilet, as does happen occasionally, though normally a clogged toilet is in the toilet trap itself. A clogged sewer line will usually show up in the lowest toilet in the house since they are usually the lowest plumbing fixture. Though it can be a basement laundry tub as well. Floor drains in the basement should not be connected to the public sewers but in some older cities, they could be. Just as storm drains and sanitary sewers can be combined in some older systems. I saw something where Cleveland OH needs to spend several billion replumbing their sewers to separate the storm sewers from the sanitary sewers.
     
  19. Aug 15, 2017 #19

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,077
    Likes Received:
    547
    Neal's link also shows a definite slope toward the drain starting just below where the curtain would be, and this is the method primarily employed because it precludes hiving to platform the WC.

    We're here to offer suggestions on how he could fit a shower bath in a tight spot. The actual mechanics of how it is going to happen will not be hashed out in an internet bulletin board. Reversing the door, and doing away with a shower curb, are ways he can get more into the bathroom than is currently there.[/QUOTE]

    However, the wax ring does not seal the toilet to the floor any any way imagined that would prevent water from draining through the ceiling of a 2nd floor fixture or deteriorating the wood floor of a single story 1st floor fixture.

    Which is what would probably occur here;"Making the whole bathroom a wet space to eliminate the need for a shower curb and enclosure could work as well. You'd essentially have a tile shower pan for the entire floor in the room, with a slight curb at the door to send all the water towards the drain."
     
  20. Aug 15, 2017 #20

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    24,028
    Likes Received:
    3,164
    However, the wax ring does not seal the toilet to the floor any any way imagined that would prevent water from draining through the ceiling of a 2nd floor fixture or deteriorating the wood floor of a single story 1st floor fixture.

    Which is what would probably occur here;"Making the whole bathroom a wet space to eliminate the need for a shower curb and enclosure could work as well. You'd essentially have a tile shower pan for the entire floor in the room, with a slight curb at the door to send all the water towards the drain."[/QUOTE]

    what about caulking the toilet to the floor?:thbup:
     

Share This Page