Clean, funny stuff.

Discussion in 'Cleaning' started by inspectorD, Aug 28, 2009.

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  1. Oct 1, 2009 #21

    Nestor_Kelebay

    Nestor_Kelebay

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    Rebecca:

    If you look closely, the radio on the table is plugged into a power bar. That power bar is kept above the water's surface by the two floating sandals (one at each end of the power bar), so that the electrical connection between the power bar and the radio doesn't actually get wet. So, that connection is insulated by air, which has a very high resistance.

    The wire to the power bar is submerged. However, if there are no breaks in the insulation around the wire, then electricity cannot "leak out" of the wire into the surrounding water.

    Mixing water and electricity is only dangerous because water has a lower electrical resistance than air, and so if the power bar were to sink, electricity would "leak out" into the surrounding water to energize all the water in the pool up to 110 volts AC.

    I have a bit of trouble with that picture because I'm not convinced the people in that pool would be in any real danger even if the power bar were to sink. In order for electricity to harm you, it has to flow THROUGH you, thereby damaging the cells along the path it takes. If the power bar were to sink, then the entire pool of water would become energized, but as long as the men stayed in the pool, electricity would not flow through them. (Cuz where would it flow, into the air around them? No. Air is an insulator.) They'd be like a person touching a Van Der Graff generator; they'd be charged up to the same voltage as the generator, but because electricity wouldn't be flowing through them, they'd be in no danger.

    The men could only get a shock if they stepped out of the pool and (with one foot still in the water) touched a ground of some sort (like a steel pole that goes into the ground). But, if you look in the background to that picture, the pool is, as best we can tell, surrounded by paving stones, which are also electrical insulators. And, even if someone stepped out of the pool and stood on a conductor that was grounded:

    A) the current through their body would be very much reduced because of the high resistance of the fresh water between that person's body and the power bar. The high resistance of the fresh water in the pool is going to very much limit the current flowing through the water, and hence the body of the person stepping out of the pool, and

    B) the path the electricity would travel would be in one leg and out the other. It wouldn't travel across the person's heart, and that's where the greatest danger lies. Since the heart muscle works on electrical impulses from nerves, the greatest danger is if the heart stops as a result of an electric shock, and that happens when the path of the electricity crosses the area of the heart, like in an arm and out the opposite leg, or in one arm and out the other arm.

    Actually, those guys would be in more danger if any of them were to pick up the radio to change the channel or the volume. That's cuz then they'd be putting their bodies between the voltage source and any potential ground. There's an awful lot of water in a pool, and the current flowing into that water just to energize it up to 110 volts might be enough to give the person a pretty good shock, even if the charge didn't leave the pool.

    So, that particular picture looks like these guys are unaware of the danger they're in, but I can't help thinking that as long as none of them picked up the radio, I really don't think they're in very much danger at all. You don't want to use a hair dryer or tune a radio while in a bath tub because then you're putting your body between the voltage source and the ground (the tub's metal drain pipe). But, that's not the case here.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2009
  2. Oct 1, 2009 #22

    -bud-

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    So that's why when you can't make toast in the bath tub then. The drain? what if you had a non grounded drain. Is toast in the bath OK at that point. Or Pina Colada's?
     
  3. Oct 2, 2009 #23

    Nestor_Kelebay

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    Y'know, that picture of the guys in the pool kinda reminds me of the way my late Uncle Ernie passed away. He was married to my Aunt Emily, and their water heater was out and they were waiting for the plumbers to come install a new one. So until the new heater got put in, Uncle Ernie and Aunt Emily had to heat water on the stove for bathing.

    One night Uncle Ernie was having a bath, and he called out to Aunt Emily for more hot water. "Hot Water!" called out Uncle Ernie to Aunt Emily. But, with the bathroom door closed and the TV set on, Aunt Emily misunderstood him and thought he was wanting her to bring him an "arc welder".

    It was an honest mistake, but Aunt Emily still regrets not having checked that it wasn't hot water that Ernie wanted.

    It just goes to show you how important clarity is in communicating with others.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2009
  4. Oct 2, 2009 #24
    Mr. Kelebay you slay me!
     
  5. Oct 3, 2009 #25

    Huh?

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    Clean and funny? I was cleaning out my father inlaws attic and came accross twenty years of playboys in the back. I also managed to sneek them out with out my mother in law finding them. I called him and asked what he wanted done with them and he said I could keep em. Now if only I can convince his daughter to let me keep them.
     
  6. Oct 17, 2009 #26

    repair

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    LOL Funny Stuff!!
     
  7. Oct 21, 2009 #27

    FixIt4Me

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    haha oh dearrr that must have hurt! Hope you figured it out :)
     
  8. Feb 1, 2010 #28

    subzero

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    In purchasing your cleaning supplies at a janitorial supply store, not only do you get effective cleaning products.
     
  9. Feb 1, 2010 #29

    Nestor_Kelebay

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    That line was supposed to read: Not only do you get effective cleaning products, you also get the knowledge and experience of someone who's spent a career in the cleaning business tossed in for free. That is, you get free technical support from someone who knows about cleaning.

    In the janitorial service industry, people who run Janitorial Supply stores are about the only people cleaning contractors have available to them to turn to for help. Them, and of course the sales reps for the major manufacturers operating in this sector of the economy likethe S. C. Johnson Wax Co., Diversey, Avmor, Lever Brothers and others. So, the people working at janitorial supply stores and the sales reps for the products those stores sell are the only ones a janitor can go to with a tough problem. They eventually become quite knowledgeable about what works best and how to use it to remove stains, restore shine, clean and otherwise maintain floors, walls, ceilings, carpets and upholstery.

    Since MOST of the success in cleaning lies in knowing what to use on what and how to use it to get the best results, then buying from a Janitorial Supply store is really a no-brainer because you get all of that advice tossed in for free.

    If you buy your cleaning supplies from a grocery store like most people do, then the people you have to turn to for help are the lady at the other end of the 1-800 customer service phone number and the 17 year old who stocks the shelves. I've talked to those stupid customer service agents, and most of them don't know squat. All you have to do to prove that to yourself is ask them a question about the product that isn't already answered in the usage instructions printed on the label. Most of them are about as knowledgeable as the 17 year old.

    But, I guess it's the same way with everything. If you're wanting to save money by fixing your washing machine yourself, then you'd probably do well by paying a little more and buying the parts at a local appliance repair shop than online. Cuz that way, if you run into problems, you have someone knowledgeable you can turn to for help. It's just the same thing with buying cleaning supplies. If you want to save money by doing your own cleaning, then the best option would be to buy those cleaning supplies from a Janitorial Supply store where you also get free technical support.

    (For example, most people will hire a carpet cleaning company to clean their carpet periodically. If you buy your cleaning supplies from a Janitorial Supply store, they would tell you that you can use an ordinary shop style wet/dry vaccuum cleaner to remove stains from carpets just as effectively as any contractor using professional carpet cleaning equipment. You can't shampoo a whole carpet with a wet/dry vaccuum cleaner, but you can remove stains from carpets effectively with one.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2010

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