Dryer extension cord

Discussion in 'Electrical and Wiring' started by Outbacker, Apr 19, 2009.

  1. Apr 19, 2009 #1

    Outbacker

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    I bought a new clothes washer, and the plug in is 8 inches short the receptacle, so I found a short extension cord that is 3 prong, and the same gauge as the cord for the washer, and it works fine. The manual (yes, I even read it) said to NEVER USE AN EXTENSION CORD! Why not if it is rated the same as the cord for the washer, and it is short (4 feet long) so I am not losing juice over a long distance? Anyone see a problem with this? It is easier to do this then cut the drywall, put in a new receptacle when it is only 8 inches short? I cannot move the washer closer to the wall as the dryer is in the way.

    Thanks for the input.
     
  2. Apr 19, 2009 #2

    Blue Jay

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    The concern is for connections and people using one that is too small of gauge. I would keep it as short as possible.
     
  3. Apr 19, 2009 #3

    kok328

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    You could buy a longer 3prong cord of same guage, remove the panel from the washer and hardwire it in. NOTE: This will most likely void your warranty!
     
  4. Apr 19, 2009 #4

    travelover

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    Don't worry about it. Their warning is to keep someone from plugging in 100 feet of 20 gauge extension cord and burning out the motor. Four extra feet of same gauge wire is fine.
     
  5. Apr 19, 2009 #5

    speedy petey

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    While I never advocated something that is non-compliant, they also say this about rooms air conditioners, yet they sell 3, 4, 5, 6 foot A/C extensions cords. I really don't see the harm in using something like that for your washer. Make sure it has at least #14 or #12 conductors.
     
  6. Apr 20, 2009 #6

    DaveyDIY

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    Title of thread: "Dryer Extension cord"

    or a clothes washer as you discuss?

    Which is it?
    BIG difference unless the dryer is gas
     
  7. Apr 20, 2009 #7

    speedy petey

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    Yeah, duh. How'd we miss that?

    So which one is it? :confused:
     
  8. Apr 20, 2009 #8

    DaveyDIY

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    I'm assuming like everyone that it is a washer
    Since he discusses a washer & states the dryer is in the way of getting the washer closer to the outlet. And the outlet is in the drywall
    I've never seen a dryer outlet (240v) in the wall...but who knows

    Just want to make sure :)
     
  9. Apr 20, 2009 #9

    speedy petey

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    Really? That's the only way I do them in new work.
     
  10. Apr 20, 2009 #10

    DaveyDIY

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    Well, most of the ones I have seen are in unfinished areas of basements :eek:
     
  11. Apr 20, 2009 #11

    Outbacker

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    My mistake. Yes it is a washer, not the dryer that I am asking about. Thanks for the excellent replies.
     
  12. Apr 20, 2009 #12

    Nestor_Kelebay

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    I'm wondering if the "no extension cord" clause has more to do with using an extension cord in poor condition. In that case, if the extension cord is in rough shape, and the washer leaks, and the extension cord gets wet, there could be a very lucrative lawsuit in there for an enterprising customer who suffers a very painful and mentally scarring shock because of the manufacturers negligence in not warning customers not to use extension cords with it's products.

    That is, the warning was put in by the legal department to keep the company out of court.
     
  13. Apr 20, 2009 #13

    DaveyDIY

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    I'd say you hit the nail on the head

    If water runs down the cord to the extension cord you risk a shock
    Probably a legal matter
    I'm not sure how much power a washer pulls - 7a ??
     
  14. Apr 21, 2009 #14

    Nestor_Kelebay

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    It wuz a lucky guess.

    I'm not sure it would matter how much amperage is going through the washing machine. Getting a shock from an electrical cord means that your body has become a second electrical path the electricity can take. I don't see why the current through the first path would have any effect on the current through the second path unless the total is enough to trip the breaker.

    What would matter is now much power was available in that cord. I'd rather be shocked by a washer than an electric dryer cuz the dryer is fused to 30 amps.

    (Not that I'd prefer to be shocked at all if I had a choice in the matter.)
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2009

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