Front porch... Foyer?

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by Keith O, Jun 28, 2008.

  1. Jun 28, 2008 #1

    Keith O

    Keith O

    Keith O

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    The front of our house is pretty plain so I want to add to the roof by adding a front porch. It is going to be a 4 to 12 pitch gable end and it will be all open. Two small square columns to hold up the front.

    My first question. Because it is open and not enclosed does this make it a foyer?

    Next: after I strip off the shingles I am going to lay 2x6's on the sheathing and nail them to the trusses to make a base for the valley on each side and to have a place to nail the jack rafters. How do I calculate the angle where the 2x6's meet at the top and is this the correct way to handle this?

    Third: I want the lower part of the original roof to show so I was going to plan it out with the columns being 18" higher than the facia of the old roof and then run 2x12's from the top of the columns to the roof for the new trusses to sit on with the one closest to the old roof attached to the ridge pole. Does this sound correct or am I going to run into problems?
     
  2. Jun 28, 2008 #2

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    Hello Keith:
    1. No, it is not a foyer. It would have to be enclosed to qualify.
    2. The 2 X 6s sound like a good idea but I never used anything like that; just nailed the rafters to the deck.
    3. Which is part of 2 also. I would set the 2 X 12s for the beams, set the trusses, stretch a string across the tops of the trusses and continue it to the existing roof. That should center the ridge up and level it; you can check the level of the string with a line level before you cut anything. Then measure to the tails of the nearest truss from the centerline to verify the centering. The rafters will need a compound cut at the bottom which you can determine with a Swanson speed square. Once you deck this frame it will be very strong and sturdy. Use a 2' wide metal valley and weave the shingles in the valley. The weave instructions are usually on the shingle bundle.
    Glenn
     
  3. Jun 28, 2008 #3

    Keith O

    Keith O

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    Thanks Glennjanie. The 2x6's are a nailer so the jack rafters won't be nailed to the sheathing if a rafter falls in between two trusses. We have to be concerned about wind and up lift.

    I still don't know how to figure the angle I cut the 2x6's so they meet at the top. It will form an up side down v. I think that angle is critical because the 2x6 nailer will have the jack rafters nailed to them which will form the valley on each side. If I'm off it won't be even.
     
  4. Jun 29, 2008 #4

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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  5. Jun 29, 2008 #5

    Keith O

    Keith O

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