Help finding recessed lights

Discussion in 'Electrical and Wiring' started by knlsand, Jan 13, 2008.

  1. Jan 13, 2008 #1

    knlsand

    knlsand

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    I seen part of a program where they were installing cans for recessed lighting in new construction. What I thought made them so nice was, they are installed even with joist so you can drywall over and cutout holes later. Has anyone out there seen these? The people I have talk to think im nuts.
    Hope you guys can help,
    Mike
     
  2. Jan 13, 2008 #2

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    You will find in new construction that drywallers mark the location of the boxes and then router them out later. Is this what you mean?
     
  3. Jan 13, 2008 #3

    knlsand

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    No thats not what i mean. The only ones i seem to find out there have a small flange and requires a cutout to be made before totally securing drywall.
    These have no flange so you could actually finish the ceiling totally then come back and make cutouts.
    Hope that makes more sense.
     
  4. Jan 13, 2008 #4

    Daryl in Nanoose

    Daryl in Nanoose

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    The pot lights I see up here have a flange that fits on with springs after the drywall is finished.
     
  5. Jan 13, 2008 #5

    booft

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    Anyone have pictures of this, I kind of know what you mean, I think but still unsure a little bit. I might be thinking of something else though too.
     
  6. Jan 13, 2008 #6

    knlsand

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    Maybe im using the wrong terms, sorry if im driving you guys crazy. Lets start over.
    The housings that get mounted to the joists dont have a ring that sticks down. These are mounted even with the botton of joist allowing you to cover with drywall and cutout hole at a later time. Im not sure they could be something new.
     
  7. Jan 14, 2008 #7

    ToolGuy

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    I wouldn't know where to find them, either now or when it came time to do the cutouts. :confused:
     
  8. Jan 15, 2008 #8

    speedy petey

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    You are talking about Lightolier 1XXX series. They are exactly as you describe, and yes, they are nice for the reason you state. It is rare to have the rock all messed up around them since there is no flange to deal with.
    Just cut them out IMMEDIATELY, or you WILL lose one every now and then.
     
  9. Jan 15, 2008 #9

    ToolGuy

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    Of course, since most layouts are evenly spaced you can always measure to find one that had it's pencil mark mudded over.

    I've personally never happened into these flangeless cans but I've been thinking about it and I like the idea. when I use my rotozip to cut around the flanges there is little room for error, as the thickness of the bit riding on the outside of the flange makes for a hole just slightly smaller than the finish ring. Every time the rotozip decides to follow it's own path (and it sometimes does), I end up with a few cutouts that need a little extra attention when mudding the room. But if I'm cutting inside the perimeter of the can, the cutout is no larger than the inside of the can. Also, I don't thing the rotozip could take off on it's own if it wanted to.

    I'm sure it doesn't make a difference to the client (I'm a contractor), as long as the lights are of a good quality and offer a reasonable selection of finish rings. But if the contractor is choosing the cans to be used, these seem like a really good, time saving choice.

    I don't do anything electrical anymore, but I still like to know what excellent products are out there. Thanks for starting this topic. ;)
     
  10. Jan 16, 2008 #10

    guyod

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    I just installed my first cans last week. they sounded like the type knlsand was talking about. you installed it flush with the rafters/joists and once you cut out the hole there was screws you loosened to drop the can flush with the drywall. got them at lowes. maybe there all like that i dont know. is it important that can be dropped flush with the drywall? i installed them in a drop ceiling so it didnt matter .
    i used my rotozip like tool guy said first time it actually worked like it was suppose to in a ceiling tile.
     
  11. Jan 16, 2008 #11

    ToolGuy

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    All the cans I've installed have the solid flange, thus had to do the cutout before I could finish fastening the drywall. I guess it's not really required that you drop the flange, but I don't see why you wouldn't want to. At the very least, I'd prefer to have metal between the heat of the bulb and the ceiling material, be it drywall or drop ceiling panels.
     
  12. Jan 16, 2008 #12

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    You will. The trim.
     
  13. Jan 16, 2008 #13

    ToolGuy

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    Uhh.... of course, I knew that. I was just testin' ya. Good job. :p

    Question: Why would someone not drop the flange down like they're suppose to? :confused:
     
  14. Jan 16, 2008 #14

    guyod

    guyod

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    the question is are you suppose to? maybe that is the difference between cans for insulated and uninsulated
     
  15. Jan 17, 2008 #15

    ToolGuy

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    And the plot thickens... :cool:

    I think I'd drop the sleeve down just so the client doesn't ask me why I didn't. And if I'm doing something for myself (yeah right, that'll ever happen), I'll drop it for structural integrity, in case of a hurricane or earth quake. :eek:
     
  16. Jan 17, 2008 #16

    guyod

    guyod

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    what is the differance between the insulated and non insulated ceiling cans? Is this question related enough of should in be a new thread?
     
  17. Jan 17, 2008 #17

    ToolGuy

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    You mean insulated cans or cans for insulated ceilings? The later is in a metal box to keep the insulation away from it. And just post it in any ol' thread, it doesn't really matter. I think there's one about drywalling a basement that is open to off topics. ;)
     
  18. Jan 17, 2008 #18

    guyod

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    I was talking about the later. when i was looking at the two different kinds at the big box store. I didnt see any in a big box. i could see any real difference. maybe the cans are double lined...
     
  19. Jan 17, 2008 #19

    ToolGuy

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    Yeah, I was guessing. Maybe double lined is it. Let's find out...
     
  20. Jan 17, 2008 #20

    ToolGuy

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