New outlet for Garage Door Opener

Discussion in 'Electrical and Wiring' started by bootpdx, Sep 8, 2009.

  1. Sep 8, 2009 #1

    bootpdx

    bootpdx

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    Howdy y'all. I am getting ready to install a new outlet for a new garage door opener in a garage and hope the expert and very helpful members of this forum can advise me.

    My garage is unfinished (no drywall) with no plans to finish it. It currently only has one outlet, I need to install more and have many blanks on my new panel to do so, but that is a separate project. My opener requires 120volt. I am planning on running 12 gauge NM wire directly from a 20 amp single pole breaker to a single 20 amp 120 Volt outlet. Should I use a GFCI outlet? Can I use any box for a ceiling outlet?

    When I do add more outlets to the garage, is 20 amps standard for power tools etc.? I was planning on running 15 amp circuits for the lights.

    Thanks - this forum rocks!
     
  2. Sep 8, 2009 #2

    kok328

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    GFIC outlet is not necessary for a garage door opener outlet.
    20 amp circuit is not necessary for a garage door opener, you can use a 15 amp circuit with 14/2 NM wire.
    You can use a 2x4 plastic outlet box.
    20 amp circuit would be better for power tools in a garage.
    15 amp circuit is fine for standard lighting (incandescent or flourescent).
     
  3. Sep 8, 2009 #3

    bootpdx

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    kok328 - thanks - this is exactly why I only visit this forum. Thanks for correcting me and setting me straight.
     
  4. Sep 9, 2009 #4

    JoeD

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    Under the new 2008 code ALL receptacles in a garage, including the door opener need to be GFCI. I don't think you need 20 amp. 15 amp is more than enough for an opener.
     
  5. Sep 9, 2009 #5

    bootpdx

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    Thanks Joe!
     
  6. Sep 9, 2009 #6

    mudmixer

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    Just put the outlet in the obvious position (ceiling) near the opener where it will be out of the way.
     
  7. Sep 9, 2009 #7

    kok328

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    Hey JoeD, do you have the NEC section/paragraph that supports your statement.
    This may be a Canadian code which is not covered by NEC.
    The motor start up draw with capacitor will most likely trip the outlet.
     
  8. Sep 9, 2009 #8

    speedy petey

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    It certainly is in the 2008 NEC.


    (A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in (1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.

    (2) Garages, and also accessory buildings that have a floor located at or below grade level not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and areas of similar use

    Handbook commentary:

    The requirement for GFCI receptacles in garages and sheds, as illustrated in Exhibit 210.10, improves safety for persons using portable handheld tools, gardening appliances, lawn mowers, string trimmers, snow blowers, and so on, that might be connected to these receptacles, which are often the closest ones available. GFCI protection is also required in garage areas where auto repair work and general workshop electrical tools are used.
    [​IMG]
    Exhibit 210.10 Examples of receptacles in a garage that are required by 210.8(A)(2) to have GFCI protection.
    The exceptions to 210.8(A)(2) have been deleted from the 2008 Code, to ensure that all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in garages provide GFCI protection for the user of appliances or other equipment regardless of where the receptacle is located in the garage. Appliance leakage currents permitted by today's product standards are far less than the operational threshold of a GFCI.
     
  9. Sep 9, 2009 #9

    kok328

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    Thanks for the update Speedy, that's the info. I was looking for but, still don't see where it says that a ceiling outlet needs to be GFI. Who climbs a ladder to plug in the above mentioned equipment?
     
  10. Sep 9, 2009 #10

    speedy petey

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    It doesn't, specifically. It does not have to.

    210.8(A) says all 125v 15 & 20a receptacles in (1) through (8). (2) is "Garages", and similar residential outbuildings. All the previous exceptions were removed, such as inaccessible (ceilings) and behind large appliances.
     
  11. Sep 9, 2009 #11

    kok328

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    Would the "Appliance leakage currents permitted by today's product standards are far less than the operational threshold of a GFCI" statement, indicate that a capacitor start/run motor on an older garage door opener, would not cause enough current imbalance to trip the GFI?
     
  12. Sep 10, 2009 #12

    JoeD

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    It says ALL receptcles. That would include ceilings.
     
  13. Sep 10, 2009 #13

    GBR

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    "My garage is unfinished (no drywall) with no plans to finish it." ----- Sounds like it is a detached garage. If within 3' to property line, 1 hr. construction required... 302.1
    If tied to the house (attached), a lot more requirements are stated per code. Be safe, G
     
  14. Sep 10, 2009 #14

    speedy petey

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    How so?

    I am working on a new house right now that has an attached garage with sheetrock ONLY on the house wall.
     
  15. Sep 12, 2009 #15

    kok328

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    I was talking to an associate the other day and he said that there is a way around this.
    I mentioned to him my concern about the capacitor causing an imbalance in the current and he agreed that this may trip the GFI outlet.
    He informed me that if the garage door outlet on a dedicated or non-dedicated circuit was a single use outlet that it would not be required to be an GFI outlet as it would no longer be considered an accessible outlet. The other way around this was that if the outlet was a duplex and had two garage doors plugged in, it too would now be considered a non-accessible outlet. I know, it doesn't sound right but, he's had no problems passing inspections using this technique.
     
  16. Sep 12, 2009 #16

    speedy petey

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    Under the 2008 NEC this is 100% INCORRECT. ALL 125v 15 & 20a receptacles MUST be GFI protected...REGARDLESS if they are accessible or not.

    Sorry, this is the plain truth. Maybe your area is not under the 2008 NEC yet?
     
  17. Sep 12, 2009 #17

    kok328

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    No, I see your point of view and it is correct. This simple and plain english is intentional to avoid any confusion and/or loopholes. While some areas of the NEC can be interpreted in different ways, this one is clearly stated. I was just relaying what his experience has been regarding this subject.
    I would imagine that anyone in the U.S. is under NEC (National EC).
    I happened to notice that JoeD was from Ontario so I wasn't sure what his code says and whether NEC applies to Ontario.
    Out of curiosity, I will use an extension cord and plug my door opener into a protected outlet to see what happens.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2009
  18. Sep 14, 2009 #18

    JoeD

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    I am from Ontario. NEC does not apply here. However I can quote some code issues from either area as required. In Ontario we do need the GFCI.
    If your region is still on the 2005 NEC then you friend is correct. Under the 2008 NEC he is wrong.
     
  19. Sep 16, 2009 #19

    GBR

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    Speedy petey: I was making the point you mentioned. He said NO DRYWALL - there has to be some on the (garage side) of house/garage wall and garage ceiling if it touches the house (is common) IRC 309.2 5/8" min. drywall on ceiling common to house. Otherwise, it is detached.... Some builders opt to drywall/fire tape the garage truss/rafters over the house/garage joint to save money and time instead of the garage ceiling. In your case the house may have been built before code was enforced-- pre'73, when I started framing.
    Be safe, Gary
     

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