Broken Faucet

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by marinadamico, Nov 24, 2009.

  1. Nov 24, 2009 #1

    marinadamico

    marinadamico

    marinadamico

    New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    How do I replace a broken washing machine faucet (picture included)? And, can I do it being that I've never fixed any plumbing problems?

    Faucet.jpg
     
  2. Nov 24, 2009 #2

    Redwood

    Redwood

    Redwood

    Certified Lunatic

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2009
    Messages:
    887
    Likes Received:
    0
    That would probably not be the easiest job for you to do for starters in your plumbing DIYer Career.:2cents:
     
  3. Nov 24, 2009 #3

    marinadamico

    marinadamico

    marinadamico

    New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't disagree at all! But, I am really handy and a fast learner! All I need is step by step instructions!
     
  4. Nov 24, 2009 #4

    kok328

    kok328

    kok328

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    2,755
    Likes Received:
    249
    If you can find a replacement handle, it's as easy as taking the screw out of the top and lifting off the broken handle, push the new one back one and replace the screw.
    However, most washing machine supply lines are left on all the time.
    Hook up your hoses, use some channel lock pliers to turn on the water and your done.
     
  5. Nov 24, 2009 #5

    marinadamico

    marinadamico

    marinadamico

    New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Would it be better, in the grand scheme of things, to change the faucet piece all together? And if so, is that just as easy? I'm asking because not only am I a rookie but when the plumbers came to give me an estimate, they said right around $200 because they have to get into the wall where the faucet connects to the pipe because you can't just replace the faucet piece. Now, obviously I do not trust or believe them, which is what led me here :)
     
  6. Nov 24, 2009 #6

    travelover

    travelover

    travelover

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2007
    Messages:
    693
    Likes Received:
    2

    +1 for this approach. Now would be a good time to inspect your hoses, too, as burst hoses are an ongoing risk and if you can't turn off the water quickly, it makes it worse.
     
  7. Nov 24, 2009 #7

    marinadamico

    marinadamico

    marinadamico

    New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    A-HA! I think I was asking the question incorrectly! I've been doing research online and found some good stuff! So, here is the new question, how do I replace a washing machine shut-off valve (because the plastic piece on top of the faucet is broken)! Please refer to original picture included!
     
  8. Nov 24, 2009 #8

    Redwood

    Redwood

    Redwood

    Certified Lunatic

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2009
    Messages:
    887
    Likes Received:
    0
    The replacement handle alone probably will not cut it even if you were to find a handle that fits...


    Most of the time the valve is bound up and that is why the handle broke which puts us back in the position of a noobie that has never sweat a pipe before heading inside the walls for his first attempt on a vertical pipe with plastic to melt above...

    The Plumbers were cheap!
    What we charge here would have been higher...
     
  9. Nov 25, 2009 #9

    Nestor_Kelebay

    Nestor_Kelebay

    Nestor_Kelebay

    Emperor Penguin

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Messages:
    1,844
    Likes Received:
    2
    Those look like quarter turn ball valves, eh?

    An alternative might be to simply clamp a pair of small locking pliers onto the blue handle to extend the life of what he/she has as much as possible. Yeah, I know, it's a hoser solution, but it would work.

    Marina Damico:
    Take a close look at the faucet, especially the handles and see if you can find a name of a manufacturer on it anywhere. Look for names like Delta, Waltec or Moen.

    I think all the poster really wants is instructions on how o change the handle. The faucet MAY last for many years with a new handle.
     

Share This Page