Load bearing wall removal

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by ikessky, Aug 24, 2009.

  1. Aug 24, 2009 #1

    ikessky

    ikessky

    ikessky

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    I have attached a rough floor plan for your review. Basically, we want to make the wall represented by the red lines into a half wall surrounding the basement stairs. The length of the wall we would be removing is maybe 15'. The roof is a hip roof with regular spliced rafters. In the basement, there is a steel beam running the length of the house, sitting directly beneath the red wall on the right hand side. Therefore, I'm pretty sure that is my load bearing wall. We really don't want to do a beam and header and sacrifice head room. I was talking to my father-in-law and he suggested going into the attic crawl space, cutting an area in the rafters and installing a beam from the end of the house to the hallway (represented by the blue lines) and then using joist hangers to tie the rafters into the beam. We also talked with another family member who does general contracting and he suggested running lvl from the one end to the hallway above the rafters and then tying the rafters into that lvl, which would be easier because I wouldn't have to cut the rafters, provide temporary support inside the house, etc. I could get the lvl up there, tie the rafters into it, and then begin removing the wall. No the question is, do they make some kind of special joist hanger for a beam that is overhead? I did a search and could only come up with standard joist hangers and hurricane/rafter ties. I don't think those would be sufficient, but I'm not sure. Any suggestions?

    floor plan.JPG
     
  2. Aug 24, 2009 #2

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

    glennjanie

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    Welcome Ikessky:
    I vote for the beam above the joists to hang them on. If you have manufactrured trusses, you don't need to support it at all.
    If you use a glu-lam beam rather than a steel beam, your regular hangers would work just fine.
    Glenn
     
  3. Aug 25, 2009 #3

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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    Get a permit, then run your ideas past your building inspector. they will let you know what is acceptable.
    If you do not get a permit and something should fail, your insurance may not cover you.
    And if you sell the home, you should have all the paperwork for your renovation, or it can create a lost sale.
    Go for what is called a flush beam.
    Good luck.
     
  4. Aug 25, 2009 #4

    ikessky

    ikessky

    ikessky

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    Thanks everyone. I'm thinking that I'll probably just have my family members who are GC's come over and install the beam and I'll do the rest of the work removing the wall and what not. Knowing them, they probably won't even charge me if I can lend them a hand doing something else. That way the work is certified as I don't plan on necessarily keeping this house forever.
     
  5. Mar 24, 2010 #5

    OntarioGeneralContracting

    OntarioGeneralContracting

    OntarioGeneralContracting

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    That sounds like a good plan! :)
     
  6. Mar 25, 2010 #6

    frozenstar

    frozenstar

    frozenstar

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    Absolutely agree with you on this. :) Getting a professional is worth it.
     

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