new home Insulation in basement getting wet.

Discussion in 'Roofing and Siding' started by Neo4912, Apr 3, 2013.

  1. Apr 3, 2013 #1

    Neo4912

    Neo4912

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    I have a fairly new home and i noticed in the basement at the top of the foundation where the house framing sits that the insulation gets wet and moisture gets on the basement wall. My sump pump runs up and out this same wall and on the outside i noticed that they did not caulk the pipe where it comes out the siding. Just a hole and pipe could water be gettting in and leaking down into the basement through this? Any help would be great. I will post some pictures.
     
  2. Apr 3, 2013 #2

    oldognewtrick

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    :welcome: to House Repair Talk!

    Pics would be great.
     
  3. Apr 3, 2013 #3

    nealtw

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    Any thing is posible, from the out side is there foundation showing between the bottom of the siding and the ground below, there should be 6" to 8" showing. I would remove wet insulation and allow wall to dry out while you figure this out.
    What kind of siding do you have, how big is the hole, how big is the pipe? Check the pipe for leaks when the pump is running, pipes never leak where you can see it!!
     
  4. Apr 3, 2013 #4

    Neo4912

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    here are pictures I took.

    007.jpg

    IMG_20130402_210145.jpg

    IMG_20130402_210121.jpg

    IMG_20130402_210006.jpg

    IMG_20130402_210014.jpg
     
  5. Apr 3, 2013 #5

    Neo4912

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    the foundation is about 8 inches above ground. Also seems like the yard has a good pitch away from house.

    007.jpg

    IMG_20130402_210145.jpg

    IMG_20130402_210121.jpg

    IMG_20130402_210006.jpg

    IMG_20130402_210014.jpg
     
  6. Apr 3, 2013 #6

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    I would expect to see water staining on the wood around the pipe on the inside.
    Water travels some distance some times so I would pull insulation 2or 3 bays to the left and simular distance around the corner to see if you can find evendence of water being there.

    When the pipe went in before the siding went up there should be a peel and stick around it so water would just be stopped and would run down the house wrap and out. But there are 2 other things may have happened. If the plumber installed the pipe after the siding, it should have been sealed better, or the plumber installed it first and left the fitting loose for the siding guy and perhaps that fitting hasn't been glued.
    I think you have more water than I would expect from a little rain coming in there. You may have to waite until it happens again and try to follow it to the soarse then.
     
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  7. Apr 3, 2013 #7

    inspectorD

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    I Would just caulk with a product such as Geocell or Lexel caulk. it looks a simple as water running down the siding and following the pipe inside. Also, check to see that all the fittings are glued, could also be a combination of issues. Check it with the hose, don't wait for it to rain again.
    Let us know what your find, good luck.
     
  8. Apr 3, 2013 #8

    oldognewtrick

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    Yep, what inspector said, plus check any openings or penetrations above where the pipe exits for gaps also.
     
  9. Apr 3, 2013 #9

    nealtw

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    The other suspect for a leak in the spring is the outside hose bib. Only leaks inside when the outside water is turned on.
     
  10. Apr 4, 2013 #10

    bud16415

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    A good method to isolate a problem like this is to use your garden hose. Have someone stand outside and apply a small spray above the pipe only. Simulate the rain running down the siding. Inside if you see the water coming in you now know the spot of entry. Give it a little time to travel over. If you get nothing then try the hose at a different location you suspect say above a window etc.
     
  11. Apr 5, 2013 #11

    GBR

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    I too, think it is your sump pump discharge line leaking at a fitting. Pull the insulation, dry framing with hair dryer, add water to run sump, watch and feel for leaks. It could also be an exterior fitting wetting/spraying the siding/sheathing/housewrap under the vinyl siding, running back inside through joint of joist/mudsill (especially is H.W. is not lapped over mudsill). If in a heating climate, you may want to change your fiberglass for rigid foamboard after air-sealing the wood rim joists. http://www.buildingscience.com/docu...joist/files/bscinfo_408_critical_seal_rev.pdf

    On a lesser note; the fiberglass is stopping the uncovered sump well water and condensing there due to the furnace leak at the elbow ducting blowing air/moisture vapor constantly in that bay.
    Gary
     

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