Needing advice on how to tackle drywall repairs

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by MrsStark, Jun 11, 2018.

Help Support House Repair Talk by donating:

  1. Jun 11, 2018 #1

    MrsStark

    MrsStark

    MrsStark

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2018
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Southern Indiana
    Hello Everyone!!

    I apologize in advance if I'm posting this in the wrong forum, or if some parts of my post belong elsewhere. I'm VERY NEW to understanding the lingo of home remodeling, so I've tried to point out my areas of concern as easily as possible, without making a fool of myself haha

    But a little info on the property, it was built in 1979 and seems to have been built in a rush, and had the most basic upkeep. The previous owners had definitely tried to take the easy way out on A LOT of "projects", which now has become my problem.

    One major pattern that appears all throughout the house, that drives me absolutely insane, is how the walls were constructed/have been treated over the years. There has been (what I assume to be) a very shoddy job in drywall taping and finishing that has left every wall and ceiling looking pitiful.

    1? Is there a reasonable do-it-yourself fix for smoothing out drywall taping (red arrows), sloppy
    drywall seams
    (black arrows), uneven soffit seams (orange arrows), and chipped drywall
    that's been painted over
    (yellow arrows)?


    2? Are there any do-it-yourself tricks to filling in and smoothing out very deep cracks that have paint
    build up (pink arrows), cracks that have been painted over (blue arrow), and cracks that have
    formed through the paint
    (purple arrows)?


    3? Is there any way to fill-in the gaps between the moulding and drywall, and the corners where the
    two window moldings meet (green arrows)?

    Again I apologize if I'm asking too much, as you can see there's just a lot of attention needed. Any and all tips and tricks of the trade are greatly appreciated!

    Thank you!!


    Living - Upper Left Bay Window.JPG Living - Lower Left Bay Window.JPG Living - Lower Left Center Bay Window.JPG Living - Upper Right Bay Window.JPG Foyer.JPG Foyer - Foyer Hall.JPG Bathroom - Vanity Soffit.JPG
     
  2. Jun 11, 2018 #2

    jeffmattero76

    jeffmattero76

    jeffmattero76

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2016
    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    89
    As far as the drywall repairs are concerned, they can all be fixed fairly easily. I will describe some of the fixes, but I would recommend that you go to YouTube and watch the videos there by SirMixAlot.

    Wherever there are cracks, you will likely find detailed that the drywall on one or both sides is not properly attached to the wall studs. Push on the drywall close to the crack, one side at a time, and you will probably see that it moves slightly. The remedy is to get a stud finder and install a drywall screw about an inch away from the crack at each stud location. Once done, use a utility knife to open the crack slightly, scrape or sand any old patching compound that may have been used, and cover the crack with mesh drywall tape. Then mix up some setting type joint compound and apply it smoothly over the crack. The next day, scrape or lightly sand any tool marks in that joint compound, and apply another coat with a wider knife. Do it again the next day with an even wider knife. Let that dry, and sand it flay using sandpaper on a drywall sanding block.

    For gouges, just scrape or sand the area surrounding the gouge to make it flat (no paint bumps, etc), and then apply joint compound. You will likely have to do that 2 or 3 times because the joint compound shrinks as it dries.
     
    MrsStark and bud16415 like this.
  3. Jun 11, 2018 #3

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,702
    Likes Received:
    695
    Welcome.
    Depending upon your sense of adventure, you can mask off and accomplish all the prep work, or room by room.

    Bay Window,Foyer,Soffit
    With a utility knife cut a "V" notch where there is cracks and/or what you describe as "paint build". you do not need to cut through the drywall, just into it enough to provide a good bonding surface for the patching compound.

    It appears that some of what you are calling taping errors are actually caused by the corner bead having not been set correctly, who's appearance can be corrected with compound and sanding.

    Foyer
    Caulking is the simple answer for the gaping at the molding.

    This is my method; I use 20min & 5min dry setting compound mixed, measured with a 6" drywall knife in a 12" pan, at 2-20's and 1-5 and enough water for a workable paste.

    Paper tape is thinner than mesh tape.

    Smooth fill the "V", apply the dampened tape, apply another filling coat of compound tight to the edges of the tool, you do not need to be scrapping a bunch of extra mud off the walls.

    Lightly sand if necessary and apply topping.

     
    MrsStark likes this.
  4. Jun 11, 2018 #4

    jeffmattero76

    jeffmattero76

    jeffmattero76

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2016
    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    89
    Snoonyb - I thought I had always read that you should use mesh tape with setting compound, and paper tape with pre-mixed joint compound.

    Also, I have had great success in corners using a product called Perfect 90 from the orange big box. If you do a search online, the product, as well as a video on how to use it, will come up.
     
  5. Jun 11, 2018 #5

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,702
    Likes Received:
    695
    I'm familiar with both, it's the build and the width of the joint when using mesh tape.

    The correct way is to remove and reinstall the corners correctly.

    I do not depend on anybodies video, just 45yrs learning curve.
     
    jeffmattero76 likes this.
  6. Aug 15, 2018 #6

    Jenny

    Jenny

    Jenny

    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Yorba Linda
    Prepping is such a pain. Is it worth hiring someone to do the prep (patch, caulk, clean, tape, move furniture, cover furniture, etc)? I don't mind the painting part... and maybe save a few bucks?
     
  7. Aug 15, 2018 #7

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,702
    Likes Received:
    695
    And how would hiring it done, save money, on the, "patch, caulk, clean, tape, move furniture, cover furniture, etc?"
     
  8. Aug 15, 2018 #8

    Jenny

    Jenny

    Jenny

    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Yorba Linda
    Yeah, maybe save 30% of the total cost and I get to paint it myself?
     
  9. Aug 15, 2018 #9

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

    Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2009
    Messages:
    11,231
    Likes Received:
    1,614
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    My experience is trying to get by on the cheap has cheap results. Just my 2 cents..
     
  10. Aug 15, 2018 #10

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,702
    Likes Received:
    695
    Only if you value your time as being more important then that of an experienced tradesmen.
     
  11. Aug 15, 2018 #11

    Jenny

    Jenny

    Jenny

    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Yorba Linda
    I see... for the painting part you mean. A lot of people do paint inside their homes. I was going to try painting a bedroom to start. Using quality paint though. I just don't like to prep and I think if prep is done correctly (by a pro), then less room for error on painting
     
  12. Aug 15, 2018 #12

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,702
    Likes Received:
    695
    Compared to the prep, the painting is for a 1 armed blind man, so when you value the tradesmen's value, keeping mind that that would reduce the overall project by about 2/3rds, and with giving no consideration to the experience you have gained, the sacrificial lamb, is your wallet.

    Broaden your horizons, take a chance, make an effort---------someone someday, besides yourself, may thank you.
     
  13. Aug 16, 2018 #13

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

    Restoration & Renovations

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    76
    The inside corner crack I would fix with a paintable caulk. The other cracks fix as suggested. I also prefer paper tape as it is easier to cover with joint compound. For the wood gaps, use a wood filler and stain or dye to match.
     
    MrsStark likes this.

Share This Page